About your Search

20130416
20130424
SHOW
Cavuto 6
Today 5
( more )
STATION
CNBC 28
FBC 28
CSPAN 20
CSPAN2 20
CNNW 15
MSNBCW 15
KPIX (CBS) 8
KTVU (FOX) 8
SFGTV2 8
CNN 5
KQED (PBS) 5
MSNBC 5
KGO (ABC) 4
KNTV (NBC) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 224
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)
the endangered species t, it is not obeying the environment of national policy act. john: i assumed these people mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal government threatening people of jail time and huge fines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essentially going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cutting down trees before they get old enough to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not good for the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the ec
the endangered species act, it is not obeying the environment of national policycy act. john: i assumed theseeople mean well, they are not evil. >> they mean well, but their priorities are all about the species and nothing about the individual landowners who are simply trying to earn a living on their land. this is an agency that has forgotten who they serve. they should be serving the people that live on the land as well. people and the animals can coexist and they can cooperate to do this, but when you have the heavy hand of the federal governme threatening people of jail time and hugeines, if you don't do this, you will have all sorts of trouble. it creates disincentives because landowners do not want to help endangered species act if that is essential going to be an economic death sentence for them. john: hence the phrase shoot, shovel, and shut up. >> that is the trifecta that happens on some land. some people do it legally, cuing down trees before they get old engh to be habitat for the woodpeckers. it is not goodor the woodpecker, not good for the land, it is not good for the eco
violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
environment that will make people want to work here. >> reporter: despite the competition, many of the visitors from japan became interested in coming to brazil. >> translator: the more i learn, the harder it seems to do business here. but i think brazil has huge potential as a market. >> reporter: the competition for labor is starting to spread into more and more rural areas in brazil. but that's unlikely to discourage japanese companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> let's now get another check of the market figures. >>> crews at the damaged fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan have started work on a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. tokyo electric power company workers discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leaking the most. so they're placing priority on draining them. on tuesday, workers started transferring about 20 tons of water per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say th
with the environment in which i lived as a child. and i think i was right about this. ten years ago, in the fall of 1998, i gave birth to a child. i became a cancer patient at 20 and a mother at the brink of 40, which i know isn't how most people's lives are ordered, but that's how mine worked out. i am betting that in between my children's adult lives and my own, an environmental human rights movement will arise. it's one whose seeds have already been sown. i am betting that my children, and the generation of children that they are a part, will by the time they are my age -- they'll consider it unthinkable to allow cancer-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is
in what we think is going to be an okay earnings environment, but a challenging revenue environment. not every balance sheet is going to execute equally in this environment. you've got some opportunities for -- >> what it means is the fed is going to stay the course on quantitative easing, basically. >> i think that is very clear. >> greg, tell us about this new study you're out with today. >> we found three in four americans say they are not more inclined to invest in the stock market now given the fact that interest rates are at record lows and the stock market's recently hit highs. that's the same as we found a year ago. now, a year ago, you know, in the past year interest rates have come down further. the market's gone up more. yet people are not swaying. >> what's their big fear? that they've missed it already? they're afraid it's too high? they're going to pick moment? is there too many risk? what's the big fear? >> some of each. quite frankly the memories of 2008 are very fresh. a lot of people, 2008 wasn't the first time they'd been burned. they got burned in the tech bust.
plant have started a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. workers discovered 3 of 7 storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe that pools one and two are leaking the most. workers started transfers about 20 tons of water her hour to an aboveground tang nearly 40 meters away. they plan to step up monitoring to make sure no water escapes during transfer. they want to remove 220 tons of contaminated water by june. the pools will continue to lane during the operation. crews will pump any contaminated water they take back into the pool. the amount of contaminated water is increasing by about 400 tons per day. they will no longer use the underground storage pools. they're working on a way to decontaminate the water. currently only two of the operators are online and generating power. >>> a group of citizens have been waging a legal battle to shut those down, but judges said there was not enough evidence. >> the plaintiffs in this case hoped for a legal victory. now they're coming to terms with their loss. >> the court decision is really r
streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual harassment. we got these laws passed in 2010 and i will tell you why these laws are so important for us. one reason was after years of militancy women were being pushed back in the last decade and a half conlan this was the first come back, the first assertion from the side of women to regain public space or space i
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we
of drivers produces an environment of teamwork. additionally there has been sefrmentd that local customers have made inquiries about the health of the drivers in san francisco. the idea has received great reviews. to the issuance of madalinas this program has produced the lease amount of - i would strongly encourage the enhancement of this program in the future >> (calling names). >> again evening board of directors. i want to thank the doctor on his report. i have a couple of concerns that were brought up on the town hall meeting. the w hotel is on the corner of third and howard. if you're coming down third on a rush hour period it's going to be about 5 tow 7 minutes because when everybody comes to that threshold of montgomery. if you look at june the 14th of that day there was a giant against the houston as atrocities which means south of marketing is a mess. so there are other drorgsz be made there. i want to thank the director for trying to get more inspectors to help with the enforcement hopeful that won't be nitpicking with a madalinas on your shoulder. it 50 should be a rent basis
environment. now, people are a lot more positive about the u.s., so they're overweighting the u.s. the s. is still ary, very strong mark so many overweight that. and we're seeing a lot of regions like europe where investors are pretty much hands-off. so it depends, really, when you ask about how investors behave, where they come from, what region they're located in, and what region they invest in. european investors are, i would say, largely sitting on the sidelines. >> i'm going to come back to you in a moment. but let me ask you first about what's going on in the united states. a big debate about when the federal reserve is going to start winding down the stimulus. is there a downside risk to all of this free money, whether you look at what the fed has been doing with qe or what japan has been doing in terms of the stimulus there, the ecb as well. >> well, yes, it's very clear that central banks have been playing a very dominant role in the economy over the last couple of years. when i was at the imf meetings but still in davos, the talk was the central banks are still the only game in
of the stability of the environment you're in. >> the building department will typically require that kind of information. people will do a major edition. what we are wondering is why we require that information. >> great, thank you very much. it is terrific. it is fun to see a lot of the city. thank you. [train whistle blowing] global warming. [whistle blows] some say irreversible consequences are 30 years away. 30 years? that won't affect me. [brakes screech] [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this li
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
their support for the environment by banning plastic shopping bags. we sent kpix 5's len ramirez to find out the pros and cons. >> reporter: allen, i'm here in san jose. and san jose was one of the first big cities to have a bag ordinance in effect. it's been going on for more than a year so a lot of folks are getting used to the idea. and regular shoppers say it is now the new normal. >>> reporter: life after the plastic bag ban in san jose. >> i'm glad you asked. >> reporter: a year and five months since it's been on the books, and it's not a sad sack story for jill malone. >> you know, i just have a bunch of bags in my car. if i forget sometimes i just put the food in a cart and i put it -- bag it in the trunk m i think it>> rte but others complain about paying the extra dime f recyclable bag if they come shopping without them. >> it's a pain to buy them when i forget them. >> reporter: more cities are banning plastic bags including 12 new cities in san mateo county. plastic bags end up as litter, clog storm drains, don't biodegrade as easily and most are made out of unrecyclable material
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
access to them in our modern media environment it's so fractured that people are targeting small niches. how do i get young males or middle aged women or black people, and unfortunately i think some media outlets decided to use pledge dirks stereo type, even close to racism to draw in an audience and keep the audience on their platform rather than going to others. so what i try to do in this book, i try to explore that a little bit. try toy describe why that is happening and help people diffuse these things so they can recognize it when they seive it on fox news channel, on msnby, on the drudge report, they have a sense of what is going on, and they're made more media literate and they can response in a way that makes sense. >> host: eric deegans is our guest. the book "race-baiter." the numbers are on the screen. >> host: you can also contact m-deegans by social media. our >> mr. deegans, you used the term coded language. what does that mean? >> guest: well, there's lot of ways -- because i say one of the great successes of the civil rights movement is that we have reached the point wh
in the after-hours, if people are short-covering they're doing it obviously in a more difficult environment. david: who would have guessed it was in double digits less than a year ago it is trading over 200. it hasn't traded over 200 a share since september 14th, 2011. this is long way coming. liz: long way to go. david: have you been to the airport recently? you go to the airport all the time. you go home to the airport to get back to new jersey. airport delays as faa furloughs begin to kick in. liz: rich edson at the airport. what are you hearing overall about the situation, rich? overall we got hundreds of delays yesterday. airline association says we could see up to a few thousand delays because of this when you look at this, go around the country, there are delays in charlotte, there are delays elsewhere. faa is saying there are delays basically close to coast. as far as specifics are concerned they could not provide us with any ties of numbers. that has a number about folks, especially republicans in congress say this is entirely structured by the faa to inflict what they say is maxim
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: the shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments in the victims and in the sidewalk and what they will be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used and look at the components of the bomb. it will tell them if this is somebody who put this together over the internet or is this a bombmaker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to figure out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> federal and state and local law enforcement are coordinating closely. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been lawful's worst fear. a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. >> unfortunately these kinds of settings, whether it's a marathon, football, baseball, social event, concert, are attractive targets. we can't get around it. >> reporter: the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on scene this after
. they are mostly used in environments for the environment, whether it be the sand in the desert or the jungle, it would interfere with the explosive. that has been traditionally their use. that being said, these things are easy to find, easy to make. i don't have to tell you, you can look up on the internet and see the step by step instructions out to do that. and matter of assembling the various ingredients you would do to put it together. that to expand on what he was saying, they are getting a lot of evidence how the bomb was made but they don't have a lot of evidence about who did this or why. the actual evidence that would lead to the person or persons involved. >> this suggests a slightly higher level of them what was first thought yesterday and if so, does that narrow down the net of potential suspects? >> it does. the black powder, the acetone, peroxide, you don't want to let it get went. absolutely right. you want to protect the explosives, the detonator. when this bomb went off, talked to a couple of people and their first reaction was what is happening to people coming back from af
, at least superficially, to their environment, their friends, school, athletics. there was nothing unusual in their behavior. nothing unusual in their language to suggest that there was the slightest degree of un, hatred, any anti american. anything unusual about them. i am afraid this may signal perhaps another kind of terrorist, similar to what they called grassroots terrorists. they are on assuming. they are assimilated. and we have immigrants that take advantage of the freedoms and liberties year. maybe they were not the way in 2009 and 2010. something may have turned them in the meantime. it is important to figure out what it was. >> ok, now that people are doing the job that he did for so long, the people trying to make america safe, how do you tackle this kind of threat when there's no intelligence beforehand? >> ihink tre totally analytic about this kind of incident when there was no intelligence, no information, no signs. no signs about the individuals. there are only two ways this could have been avoided. had there been signs or were they were apprehended or cancel the marathon.
senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them somhing that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunityto go to break very qu
police department in the world, something i'm very proud of. but it's a complex environment. 8.4 million people. we wanted to know more about the neighborhoods that we were policing. that's the report that we did. the so-called demographics unit since change theed name, but that's what you're reporting about. it was never put in place to generate leads. it was put in place for us to have contextual information. people will say you have people not generating leads. but we generate leads in other ways, but not from that particular unit. >> how important is it it to have the cooperation of the muslim community? because one thing i'm struck by, it is citizens who report things. so the time square bomber, the police was a block away but it was a local vender who tips you off. in this case, it it appears that this guy who got his legs blown off said i want to tell you something. i saw this guy dropping a bag off. so is it important to have a cooperative relationship between a police department and these communities that you're looking at? >> sure. and we have a strong working relationship with
basis. simply because the threat environment has changed doesn't mean our constitution is so flexible that we can ignore its provisions. i do think that what we ought to call on the administration to do is come forward with a new structure and to articulate how the rule of law will support protecting the country in this new threat environment. there wasn't a case for treating this brother as an enemy combatant and i think it was very premature for my senate colleagues to call for him to be treated that way. >> congressman, thank you very much. >>> up next the attorney for american wife of tamerlan tsarnaev said she had no knowledge of the attacks. does that add up? and the destructive nature of the pressure cooker bomb and what can be done to stop them? we have a special investigation. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you coul
answer. you can reduce the risk of an incident but you cannot create a fail/safe environment. certainly not along a 26-mile plus path that goes through commercial, residential areas. it is difficult enough at an ampitheater, race track, gymnasium, or stadium. i think we'll see in the future perhaps additional security but there are certain venues that it is very, very difficult to maximize to a point where you're fairly competent that nothing can happen and certainly a marathon is one of those kinds of events. as you and i both know every day in this country there are multiple venues where hundreds if not thousands if not tens of thousands of people for social, political, athletic reasons show up. so there will be lessons learned based on this tragedy. there will be probably a little more inconvenience down the road about -- i read with great interest that the london marathon is going on. pittsburgh is having a marathon next week. they have not canceled that. they're encouraging the runners to go. there was an interesting piece by tom friedman today in the "new york times." he basically
in the environment were almost all other schools are not unionized. the other charters that they compete for kids with. it is very different with a traditional public school environment with a monopoly. you could have one of 10 unionize the competing with the nine others it is a differing union in this scenario with the traditional schools. gerri: as this plays out of lot of people out there think the only thing that will happen is that the charter schools will gain more momentum at the end of the day the parents makes the decision. what happens? >> also statewide voucher laws that i new voucher just passed in alabama major cities as voucher programs like milwaukee and cleveland and washington d.c. it is exploding across the country as school choice. not just charter schools but i have actually forgot in your question. [laughter] the that is about the only form of school choice right now is. gerri: the unions want of a piece of the prize. >> but then looked at michigan who went right to work also indiana also wisconsin. gerri: the only area that aside union growth was public-sector because privat
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between e two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and unishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very quickly, because we have run up against one f those things. >> sure. >> lou: if you w
. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it will pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interesting most people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very quickly, because we have run up against
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ]
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)